Privacy : Concealing the Eighteenth-Century Self

Privacy : Concealing the Eighteenth-Century Self

Description

Today we consider privacy a right to be protected. But in 18th-century England, privacy was seen as a problem, even a threat. Women reading alone and people hiding their true thoughts from one another in conversation generated fears of uncontrollable fantasies and profound anxieties about insincerity. In "Privacy", Patricia Meyer Spacks explores 18th-century concerns about privacy and the strategies people developed to avoid public scrutiny and social pressure. She examines, for instance, the way people hid behind common rules of etiquette to mask their innermost feelings and how, in fact, people were taught to employ such devices. She considers the erotic overtones that privacy aroused in its suppression of deeper desires. And perhaps most important, she explores the idea of privacy as a societal threat - one that bred pretense and hypocrisy in its practitioners. Through inspired readings of novels by Defoe, Richardson, Fielding and Sterne, along with a penetrating glimpse into diaries, autobiographies, poems and works of pornography written during the period, Spacks ultimately shows how writers charted the imaginative possibilities of privacy and its social repercussions.
Finely nuanced and elegantly conceived, Spack's new work should interest anyone who has relished concealment or mourned its recent demise.


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Details

Author(s)
Patricia Meyer Spacks
Format
Hardback | 248 pages
Dimensions
161 x 236 x 21.08mm | 500g
Publication date
08 Jul 2003
Publisher
The University of Chicago Press
Imprint
University of Chicago Press
Publication City/Country
Chicago, IL, United States
Language
English
Edition Statement
New
ISBN10
0226768600
ISBN13
9780226768601
Bestsellers rank
1,495,115